Gold Star Mother’s Day

Today we recognize and honor those who have lost a son or daughter while serving the United States Armed Forces. Today is “Gold Star Mother’s Day” and we wanted to thank all the Gold Star Mothers out there who paid the ultimate sacrifice. We thank you and will never forget.

Drew VachalGold Star Mother’s Day
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Naval Special Warfare Command Holds Change of Command Ceremony

Congratulations to Admiral Tim Szymanski for taking the lead today as the Commander Naval Special Warfare Command, and a special thank you to Admiral Brian Losey who led this important force this past three years. Naval Special Warfare was and will continue to be under the best leadership.

For more information visit Navy.Mil

Drew VachalNaval Special Warfare Command Holds Change of Command Ceremony
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10 Tips On Raising Resilient Kids From An Al Qaeda-Fighting Navy SEAL

By 

 on September 21, 2015
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Teach your children to overcome hardship with these tips.

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published on Fatherly, a digital lifestyle guide for men entering parenthood.  

Eric Greitens is no parenting expert, so why should you listen to his tips on raising resilient kids? Take your pick: The guy is a Rhodes Scholar with a doctoral degree in ethics, philosophy, and public policy. After doing humanitarian work in some of the less pleasant corners of the world, he became a Navy SEAL with four deployments, including a turn commanding an al Qaeda targeting cell. Along the way, he picked up a Purple Heart, a Bronze Star, and seven other major military awards and commendations. Greitens has persevered through more in one life than most could in five, and he did all that before having his first kid last year. So, how has he applied what he knows about resilience to that little adventure?

1. If you’re not a resilient guy, your kid won’t be a resilient kid.“To paraphrase Ralph Waldo Emerson, who you are will speak more loudly to your children than anything you say,” says Greitens. If they see you always able to pick yourself up when you’ve been knocked down, that’s behavior they’re going to adopt intuitively. While you’re at it, maybe try to get knocked down a little less.

2. Being resilient begins with taking responsibility.

If you have no ownership over anything — actions, property, your sister’s feelings — then you have no incentive try hard or try again when the moment calls for it. “Teach your children early not to pass the blame or make excuses, but to take responsibility for their actions” says Greitens. That doesn’t just apply when they tag their sister in the face with a rubber band; it’s just as important when they agree to walk the dog or keep their room clean.

3. Empower them through service.

Helping others teaches all sorts of important skills, including empathy and resourcefulness and an understanding that life’s a box of chocolates and sometimes you pick the one with the gross orange-flavored filling. But, more importantly, Greitens says, “Children who know that they have something to offer others will learn that they can shape the world around them for the better.” That’s a powerful source of optimism for a kid, and it will come in handy when you’re old and broke.

4. Make a daily habit of being grateful.

Now that your kids are seeing what misfortune looks like through their service, it’s a good time to introduce the idea of gratitude. If nothing else in life, they’ve got a father who loves them unconditionally and irrationally (they probably also have a roof over their head and three square meals a day, too), and not everyone is so lucky. Taking a minute out of each day to remember that makes it easier to handle whatever curveball comes next.

5. Resist the urge to fix, solve, or answer everything for them.

“Your children should know that you’re always there for them, and that they can call on you when needed,” says Greitens. “But give them the opportunity to learn to solve their own problems.” You know you’re supposed to object to this and insist that you just can’t help rushing in to save them because you love them so much, but admit it: His plan is way less work for you.

6. Help them understand consequences, for better and worse.

Learning the negative consequences of their actions is a key step in your kids’ understanding why they shouldn’t torture the dog and why they should do their homework. It’s on you to enforce the consequences that are within your control, but they don’t always have to be negative — understanding how their actions can also have positive outcomes will help them look for the best course of action in any situation.

7. Failure is a good thing.

“In failure, children learn how to struggle with adversity and how to confront fear. By reflecting on failure, children begin to see how to correct themselves and then try again with better results. A culture that rewards failure with trophies steals from children the great treasure chest of wisdom that comes from pain, from difficulty, from falling short.” Considering that, when Greitens talks about struggling with adversity and confronting fear, he means, “Shit I saw serving as a Navy SEAL,” it’s probably best to take him at his word on this one.

8. Allow risk taking.

Failure, consequences, independence, responsibility — every single one of the aforementioned tips involves your kid taking some kind of risk. If you try too hard to mitigate those risks, you mitigate your whole kid. “To be something we never were, we have to do something we’ve never done,” says Greitens. Again, Navy SEAL. Don’t argue.

9. Know when to bring the authority.

“Not every risk is a good risk to take, and adults need to be clear with children about what will and won’t be tolerated. Children don’t get to choose to ride in a car without seatbelts,” says Greitens. Properly wielded, authority actually frees your kid up to take the good kind of risks, because you’ve established safe limits within which to operate — like, in the yard, but not in the street. Or in their pants and not without pants.

10. Demonstrate your love for them every day.

What? You thought the guy was a hardass just because of the whole Navy SEAL thing?

This article, “10 Tips On Raising Resilient Kids From An Al Qaeda-Fighting Rhodes Scholar,” originally appeared on Fatherly.

Fatherly 

Fatherly is a parenting resource for men who understand that embracing what they’ve become doesn’t mean giving up who they are. Men who want to be great fathers without turning into cliches. Fatherly delivers expert-driven, evidenced-based parenting insights along with product and service suggestions tailored by age. Follow Fatherly on Twitter @FatherlyHQ
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A Navy Seal’s Morning Routine To Stay Focused & Feel Great All Day

Every day, you wake up with a frontal cortex fully charged with willpower (provided you are getting plenty of good, quality sleep!). How you apply that willpower over the course of the day can largely be affected by that first 30 minutes of your morning.

Here’s one way someone might start her day: You wake up, and while still in bed, reach for your smartphone and start scrolling through email. Then do a quick social media scan, check the Instagram and Facebook posts, and then maybe you check out a news site or two. Finally you get out of bed, go make coffee, flip on the TV, and eat a high-sugar breakfast while you watch a morning talk show.

While you do all this, you also warily try to make decisions about what you need to get done during the day. This energy spent on weighing decisions directly drains your willpower reserves. Also, you scold yourself for not having exercised the day before, further exhausting your willpower reserves. You then shower, dress, and hit the morning traffic.

I have a better option for you. Below is an outline I developed while serving in Iraq, in 2004. Despite the environmental stress that comes with being in a combat zone, I was able to start my day energized, focused, and feeling great, with a full reservoir of willpower to spend on the decisions and actions I needed to survive and accomplish my mission as a Navy SEAL leader during wartime. Here are the six steps to developing and following this power ritual:

1. Find a calm space.

Each morning, wake up and go to a place where you can be alone and settle into a space of sacred silence. This space is ideally separate from your bedroom but can be any place where you have privacy.

2. Hydrate to fuel your body.

Start your day by drinking a glass of fresh, filtered water.

3. Take just a few minutes to reflect. 

Think about your personal ethos and establish positivity through gratitude. Use your journal for this and reflect on questions like these:

  • What and for whom am I grateful for?
  • What am I excited about and looking forward to doing today?
  • What is my purpose and do my plans for today connect me to it?
  • Who can I reach out to and serve, or thank, today?

4. Focus on your breathing for at least five minutes.

I recommend my technique of box breathing. This is a discipline I teach at my SEALFIT Academy. It is a practice of deep diaphragmatic breathing, meant to be done in a quiet and controlled setting. To put it simply, you inhale for a count of five, hold for a count of five, exhale for five, and then hold your breath again for a count of five.

5. Mindfully move your body.

I recommend doing a few sun salutations, moving with the breath, or taking a brisk walk on which you remain internally focused.

6. Close the session by “dirt diving” your day. 

Review your plan for the day, make any final adjustments, and then visualize yourself going through all the major, important actions planned for the day and dominating each. This prepares your mind for winning.

Now that your internal prep is complete, you are ready to move out. For some of you this will be to have a healthy, paleo-style breakfast, to head to the gym for a workout, or to get the kids off to school. In all cases you are prepared for battle with this morning ritual.

This simple ritual is designed to fit into as little as 20 minutes. If you have more time, great, you could expand the yoga practice to an hour or more. But even if you spend just five or ten minutes and do it consistently each and every day, the results will be life-changing. Sound appealing? There’s no reason you can’t start now.

Photo Credit: Getty Images

KimA Navy Seal’s Morning Routine To Stay Focused & Feel Great All Day
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‘The best kept secret in the Navy’ — The elite boat commandos supporting Navy SEALs

By PAUL SZOLDRA SEPTEMBER 18, 2015

US Navy SWCC

Most Americans know of the elite sailors who serve on Navy SEAL teams, but there is another group of quiet professionals backing them up when they need a heavily-armed ride into or out of combat.

Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewman, better known as SWCC, serve on high-speed attack boats that can effectively patrol rivers and coastal regions around the world. Tracing their lineage back to the PT boats of World War II and combatant craft of Vietnam, SWCC (pronounced “Swick”) operators today are mostly known for their skills at inserting and extracting Navy SEAL teams.

Read more: http://www.wearethemighty.com/us-navy-swcc-2015-09#ixzz3mOowSRKW

Kim‘The best kept secret in the Navy’ — The elite boat commandos supporting Navy SEALs
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